Citizens’ Climate Lobby launches Earth-based Spirituality Action Team

Citizens’ Climate Lobby launches Earth-based Spirituality Action Team

M. Macha NightMare to speak on inaugural call

12 September 2019 — The CCL Earth-based Spirituality
Action Team announces its formation and inaugural conference call. The
team will officially launch just after the southward equinox on 24
September 2019, with an interactive call featuring guest speaker M.
Macha NightMare.

Citizens’ Climate Lobby is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, grassroots advocacy organization focused on national policies to address climate change.

“CCL has over 50 action teams in a wide range of areas, including
a dozen faith-based teams,” said T. Todd Elvins, CCL Action
Coordinator. “The Earth-based Spirituality team will give greater
visibility to an often-overlooked religious orientation.”

“The Earth-based Spirituality Team is for Pagans, Wiccans,
Witches, Occultists, Druids, Gaians, Goddess-worshippers,
Earth-worshippers, Animists, Deep Ecologists, Scientific Pantheists,
Creation-centered Christians, Secular Humanists, and Religious
Naturalists,” said Bart Everson, CCL volunteer and founding team leader.
“We enthusiastically welcome indigenous people, followers of African
Diasporic Traditions, shamanic practitioners, and anyone who shares our
reverence for Mother Earth.”

On the inaugural call, prominent ritualist M. Macha NightMare
will share her distinctly Pagan perspective on interfaith cooperation.
“We are stronger together,” she said, speaking from her home in Marin
County, California. “We needn’t sacrifice any of our uniqueness to work
with others.”

M. Macha NightMare, whose given name is Aline O’Brien, is a ritualist, both solo and collaborative, internationally published author, and activist. She co-authored The Pagan Book of Living and Dying and serves on the Advisory Boards of Cherry Hill Seminary, the Sacred Dying Foundation, and Poetry Witch Magazine. She has published two other books, and has contributed to anthologies, encyclopedia, religious studies textbooks, and periodicals.

Macha represents the Covenant of the Goddess, and CHS in the American Academy of Religion, Marin Interfaith Council, Marin Interfaith Climate Action (founding member), and United Religions Initiative, and at interfaith symposia throughout the U.S.

Currently she serves the inmates of the Wiccan circle at San Quentin State Prison.

She blogs at Broomstick Chronicles and Witch at Large: Ruminations from a Grey Perspective.

Everson, who is based in New Orleans, expressed gratitude for Macha’s
involvement, citing her depth of experience as an asset to the team. He
is hopeful that Earth-based practitioners will answer the call to
action.

“We strive to keep the sacred Earth at the center of our
practice,” Everson said. “As a result, we see action on climate change
as an urgent moral imperative. We aim to reach out into our global
communities and recruit volunteers for Citizens’ Climate Lobby. We
recognize and honor the spiritual nature of climate work.”

Links

Zoom meeting link:
https://zoom.us/j/762109354

CCL Earth-based Spirituality Action Team link:
https://community.citizensclimate.org/groups/home/2372

Zoom meeting details

Topic: EBSAT Inaugural Call
Time: Sep 24, 2019 07:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/762109354

One tap mobile
+16465588656,,762109354# US (New York)
+16699006833,,762109354# US (San Jose)

Dial by your location
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
+1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 762 109 354
Find your local number: https://zoom.us/u/aeoXaBPSTy

Bart Everson (812) 391 0818 <b@rox.com>
M. Macha NightMare (415) 454 4411 <herself@machanightmare.com>

Atheopaganism

12 September 2019 — The CCL Earth-based Spirituality Action Team announces its
formation and inaugural conference call. The team will offcially launch just after the
southward equinox on 24 September 2019, with an interactive call featuring guest speaker M. Macha NightMare.

Citizens’s Climate Lobby is a nonproft, nonpartisan, grassroots advocacy organization
focused on national policies to address climate change.

“CCL has over 50 action teams in a wide range of areas, including a dozen faith-based
teams,” said T. Todd Elvins, CCL Action Coordinator. “The Earth-based Spirituality team
will give greater visibility to an often-overlooked religious orientation.”

“The Earth-based Spirituality Team is for Pagans, Wiccans, Witches, Occultists, Druids,
Gaians, Goddess-worshippers, Earth-worshippers, Animists, Deep Ecologists, Scientifc
Pantheists, Creation-centered Christians, Secular Humanists, and Religious Naturalists,”
said Bart Everson, CCL volunteer and founding team leader. “We enthusiastically welcome indigenous people, followers of African Diasporic Traditions, shamanic practitioners, and anyone who shares our reverence for…

View original post 337 more words

Advertisements

“Observing: The shape of the ritual” by Áine Órga

Áine Órga shares the general outline of a Gaian ritual.

Humanistic Paganism

One question that is often raised by those who are coming to Paganism for the first time – whether naturalistic or not – is that of ritual content and structure. And this is a question that also needs to be answered by those whose practices are changing; for example, from theistic Pagan practices to naturalistic or atheistic ones. When I initially returned to ritual, I was doing something similar to what I had done for years as a Wicca-influenced theistic Pagan. But a lot of it felt empty; there were elements that I just didn’t believe in, and which didn’t mean anything to me. So I began to address this problem, and went about gradually reconstructing the content of my rituals.

Although Pagaian Cosmology by Glenys Livingstone was probably the most influential book I’ve ever read in terms of sorting out my attitudes towards divinity and the philosophy behind my…

View original post 1,168 more words

The Name of Gaia

To recap: The stronger formulations of the Gaia hypothesis have been authoritatively debunked, but the weaker formulations remain intact. For more, read Gaia Is Dead and Long Live Gaia.

Deep

Toby Tyrrell, author of On Gaia, finds in favor of a coevolutionary hypothesis, the notion that life and the environment are “somehow coupled.” This hypothesis is equivalent to what James Kirchner labels coevolutionary Gaia.

A brief review of the literature

Peter Ward writes that coevolutionary Gaia is “already viewed as true,” that it is “virtually no hypothesis at all.”

In a similar vein, Arthur C. Petersen holds that the weaker formulations of the Gaia hypothesis are really just “basic assumptions,” from the view of Earth systems science.

Kirchner holds that coevolution between biota and environment “is not original or unique to Gaia,” tracing the idea back to 1844 — long before James Lovelock published the Gaia hypothesis. Kirchner calls coevolution a “fact,” one that is so widely recognized that “it would seem odd to call it a hypothesis.”

What’s in a name

One question that seems to remain is that of nomenclature. Are the weaker forms of Gaia worthy of the name Gaia at all?

Tyrrell doesn’t think so. He writes that attaching the coevolutionary hypothesis to the name Gaia “only generates semantic confusion,” as this form of the hypothesis haven’t been used in any major Gaian publication. Clearly, Tyrrell has not read Primavesi’s Sacred Gaia, which concentrates on a coevolutionary model, but in fairness her theological work would seem to be outside his scope.

If Tyrrell’s work is well-received in the scientific community, the name Gaia may fall from favor as a label for any credible model of how the Earth works. But the Gaia hypothesis is notable for being known and discussed well outside of the scientific community.

And yet…

This question of naming would seem to be a matter of poetry rather than strict scientific nomenclature. Lovelock originally wanted to call his idea the “Earth feedback hypothesis”; the name Gaia is credited to the novelist and poet William Golding. It’s doubtful that Lovelock’s work would have captured the public’s imagination without this poetic license.

We might do well to inquire into the overall value of the name Gaia in the context of our modern understanding of the Earth and our relation to it. As a metaphor, Kirchner says, Gaia is “unusually rich, colorful and evocative.” In a splendid recent essay, Michael Ruse writes that “even if Gaia is not literally true, it is a metaphor worth cherishing.” The name Gaia has increased general interest in a holistic view of the Earth and its systems. Gaia can inspire feelings of gratitude, reverence and mature responsibility. That is positive.

But the name Gaia may also confuse people. The powerful image of the ancient mother goddess may lead to muddled thinking and a complacent mindset. People may lose sight of a weaker coevolutionary model and gravitate toward the stronger homeostatic and teleological models. People may think “Gaia will protect us” though the evidence does not support such hope.

It is possible to hold an image of Gaia that is both resonant with ancient wisdom and consonant with current scientific thinking. But is this an esoteric exercise limited to an intellectual elite? Can such an image capture the popular imagination?

What do you think? If you have any thoughts on the subject, please leave a comment.

References

“The Gaia Hypothesis: Can It Be Tested?” by James W. Kirchner

The Medea Hypothesis: Is Life on Earth Ultimately Self-Destructive? by Peter Ward

Sacred Gaia : holistic theology and earth system science by Anne Primavesi

On Gaia : a critical investigation of the relationship between life and earth by Toby Tyrrell

“Earth’s Holy Fool?” by Michael Ruse

“Models and Geophysiological Hypotheses” by Arthur C. Petersen in Scientists Debate Gaia: the next century